Category Archives: Allergies

Perfume/Odor Sensitivity?

Taurine is an amino acid that works to remove toxic chemicals and metabolites from the body through the phase II liver detoxification pathway. Vitamin B6 is a necessary cofactor the body uses to produce taurine. B6 and taurine levels tend to be low in individuals sensitive to perfume, which usually contain aldehydes that deplete B6 and taurine. If you suffer from a perfume/odour sensitivity, you may want to consider supplementing vitamin B6 and taurine. Also be aware of certain drugs that lower vitamin B6 such as oral contraceptives, amphetamines, chlorpromazine, isoniazid and reserpine. Consult your naturopathic doctor if you think you may benefit from taking taurine and vitamin B6.

Other signs of possible vitamin B6 deficiency: dry cracks in the corners of the mouth (cheilosis), inflammation of the tongue, eczema, fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia, irritability, and confusion.

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Ear Infection? Here’s Onion.

Believe it or not, ear infections are RARELY due to infection, which is why antibiotics do nothing for them. So, what then is the issue? For kids typically under eight years of age, the Eustachian tubes that connect the ear with the throat lay more horizontal than vertical in nature. As a result, fluid that needs to drain through the tube becomes backed up causing serious #$%*!!! ear pain. For adults, ear infections are usually the result of having a cold or allergy that congests the tube causing the fore mentioned profanity. So, what to do?

  1. Grab a medium to large sized onion.
  2. Cut in half (don’t worry about peeling).
  3. Steam for 5-10 min (or microwave for 50 sec). It should be firm (not fully cooked), but soft to touch.
  4. Wrap in clean tea towel so that only 1 towel layer covers sliced area.
  5. Cup ear with onion and hold until pain subsides. Careful, it’s hot!

Ok, so what’s the magic? The moist heat from the onion draws fluid from the ear, and warms up the mucus (onion sulfur compounds may help break up the mucus), therefore making the Eustachian tube easier to drain. Viola!

Secondary Option:I had chronic ear aches as a child, and would be taken to hospital. The MDs would pour cod liver oil in my ear followed by a cotton ball, and prescribe an over-the-counter pain killer. Seemed to help.

“What can I take for my allergies??”

The question that everyone seems to ask me. My first response is to say, “Go see an ND,” but when pushed further I suggest these options:

  1. Quercetone – known to be effective in treating symptoms.
  2. Neti pot – I have a friend who claims they cured their allergy to grass using one of these.
  3. Himalayan Salt Inhalers – one of the docs I have shadowed in practice loves to prescribe these for clearing heavy metals. Historically, salt has been used to treat and cure a multitude of conditions including both allergies and asthma.

Histamine is the culprit for allergic reactions, and is influenced by a multitude of things (e.g. carbohydrate intolerance). Therefore, allergies can sometimes be a real challenge to treat.